Climate Change – March 6th

CHURCHES TOGETHER IN KEW:

CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS CHALLENGES.

We are all increasingly aware of the importance of better understanding of climate change and its implications for us all. As Christians, we have a particular responsibility to understand how it is affecting our fellow human beings in different parts of the world.

In conjunction with St Anne’s Social Justice Forum, Churches Together in Kew invites you to a series of three ‘conversations’ that address the scientific basis for recognising climate change and the nature of a faithful Christian response.

LENT. Tuesday March 6th, 7.45pm – 9.15pm.
First conversation. The Barn Church, Atwood Avenue. TW9 4HF

Bishop David Atkinson and Father Nicholas King SJ. “Climate and Gospel” – the science of climate change and Pope Francis’ encyclical, Laudato Si: on care for our common home.

SPEAKER DETAILS:
Bishop David Atkinson now retired as Assistant Bishop, Diocese of Southwark, was formerly Fellow and Chaplain of Corpus Christi College, Oxford; Canon Chancellor of Southwark Cathedral; Archdeacon of Lewisham; and Bishop of Thetford. David has taught theology in Oxford, lectured in the USA and India and has written a number of books on Christian Ethics and Pastoral Theology. Among his titles is Renewing the Face of the Earth: A theological and pastoral response to climate change (Canterbury Press, 2008). He served for several years as a board member of Operation Noah, a Christian organisation providing leadership, focus and inspiration in response to the growing climatic threat and is now a patron of that organisation. During that time he led the theology group that created ‘Climate change and the purposes of God: a call to the Church’ (2012), a document that challenges the Church to recognise that care for the world is central to its mission and fundamental to the Gospel.

Father Nicholas King SJ writes on the Jesuit website:

“ I was born in Bath in 1947. After I left school, I went up to Oxford to read Classics, with the firm intention of becoming a wealthy barrister after that. However at a particular moment, which I can date to within a few minutes, and greatly to my surprise, I realised that the only thing that I could do if I was to be happy was to join the Jesuits, who had taught me at Stonyhurst. That was 47 years ago, and (so far) I have seen no reason to change my mind… For the last twelve years I have been teaching New Testament and Greek at the University of Oxford, where I am at Campion Hall, the Jesuit house. Most recently I have published a translation of the entire Greek Bible into English, something that I can hardly believe. Before I came back to Oxford, I taught for many years in South Africa, which was one of the most remarkable experiences of my life. Jesuits do all sorts of things, and our task is to do whatever the Church asks of us. .. Let me simply say this: if it is the life for you, then there is no better or happier way of life. But it must be the life to which God is calling you.”

Climate Change – May 15th

CHURCHES TOGETHER IN KEW:

CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS CHALLENGES

We are all increasingly aware of the importance of better understanding of climate change and its implications for us all. As Christians, we have a particular responsibility to understand how it is affecting our fellow human beings in different parts of the world.

In conjunction with St Anne’s Social Justice Forum, Churches Together in Kew invites you to a series of three ‘conversations’ that address the scientific basis for recognising climate change and the nature of a faithful Christian response.

2. CHRISTIAN AID WEEK. Tuesday May 15th, 7.45pm.
Second conversation. Venue to be arranged

Ian Christie, University of Surrey and David Nussbaum, CEO of The Elders Foundation. “ Climate change and human development “ – sustainable life-styles and global action.

SPEAKER DETAILS:

Ian Christie is a research fellow and coordinator in the Sustainable Lifestyles Research Group in the Centre for Environmental Strategy at the University of Surrey. He has been a freelance researcher, adviser, teacher and writer on sustainable development and environmental policy, undertaking projects for central and local government, business and non-governmental organisations. He has also given policy advice to government ministers and officials on sustainable housing and climate policy, to the Diocese of Southwark on its environmental policy and has been a member of the advisory committee for the World Wildlife Fund’s global and national programmes.

David Nussbaum has been Chief Executive Officer of The Elders Foundation since October 2017. David graduated from Cambridge and Edinburgh Universities where he studied theology. He spent the early part of his career in the finance sector before moving to the not-for-profit sector in 1997. Starting at Oxfam, he became a Deputy Chief Executive and also served as interim head of its India programme. He then moved to Transparency International at its International Secretariat in Berlin, from 2002-2007 where he was Chief Executive and from there to the World Wildlife Fund, the leading global environmental organisation which operates in some 100 countries.

Social Justice Forum, 6th meeting, February 2017

The next Social Justice Forum meeting will be on Saturday February 11th from 10am to noon, in the Church. Our first hour will include our usual study time and twenty minutes of silent prayer and reflection.

Apologies but Judge John Manuell’s scheduled talk on February 11th has been postponed. We will let you know when a new date has been arranged. The Social Justice Forum meeting will go ahead as planned.

The Social Justice Forum is a group of people from St Anne’s, who, through study, prayer and action, are trying to discern what God is asking of us, the people of St Anne’s Kew, now in 2017, in relation to the great suffering and injustice of our world.

Social Justice Forum, 5th meeting, November 2016

Social Justice Forum, fifth meeting, 26 November 2016.
Twelve people came, including Father Nigel (who had to leave for another meeting at 10.30) and Claudine. Two people had to leave after the first half. Twelve people sent apologies including Christopher.
The handout is available on the St Anne’s web site, as are the other four handouts and the records of our meetings.

First half of meeting: study and prayer

After introductions, we opened with a liturgy. We divided into pairs to look at extracts from:
1. The House of Commons Home Affairs Committee report (3 August 2016) on the Migration Crisis;
2. Pope Francis’ message for the 2017 world Day of Migrants and Refugees;
3. 2016 report from the UNHCR representative in Syria.
We followed this with silent prayer and reflection.
Second half of meeting: action

Marian Mollett introduced and chaired a session on Drawing up a statement of commitment/witness/declaration for St Anne’s around refugees. We had three statements to examine (so far as we know, no statement has been issued by the Church of England):

1. St Martin in the Fields Date: September 2015  – Scope: Migration Purpose: Education/witness

2. Faith leaders letter to Government Date: July 2016   – Scope: Response to refugees Purpose:  Lobbying

3. Southwark Diocese Faith and Community Assembly Date:  October 2016  – Scope: Diversity in London Purpose   Our response –
We divided into threes to examine these statements with a number of questions and then came together with our answers:

Questions  and Answers
Question 1. What is the point of a statement? What is the connection between words and action?   Answer: A statement of what we believe that guides our behaviour/actions

Question 2. Should we write our own statement, tweak one of the three statements, or adopt one of the three?  Answer: We should adopt the Southwark statement with a short preamble using St Anne’s ‘strapline’.

Question 3. If we prepare a declaration, what should we do with it?  Answer: Suggestions included: flyers, web site, notice board, the opportunity for individuals to sign up; a launch event; sharing with CTIK, Deanery and Diocese; a feature in The Bridge; an invitation to the Mayor of London to visit us

Question 4. How will we make it a reality?  Answer” We valued point 6 in the Southwark statement – “We commit to living out this Declaration in our own life, in our teaching and preaching and in our community engagement.” Specifically, through our links with Breaking Barriers, CARAS and Refugee Action Kingston and through our prayers & reflections.

We will ask the PCC to consider this at their February meeting.

We then talked briefly about our links to refugee organisations. Sue Lloyd is volunteering with Sally Cannon at Breaking Barriers and they both think that BB are developing well as an organisation and that we should try and recruit more volunteers in the New Year. Claudine had visited Eleanor (Elly) Brown, the new Director of CARAS and had been delighted to find that CARAS were in touch with Breaking Barriers. Elly had suggested an evening meeting at St Anne’s when she and one of her staff could come and answer any questions we might have about refugees and about how systems work here and what happens to refugees in this country and we agreed that it would be helpful. Claudine will consult Father Nigel with a view to arranging a meeting in 2017. Elly is looking at the governance aspects of CARAS and will let Claudine know if there is any professional help that they might need on an occasional basis. Marjorie Evans had had a formal interview with Refugee Action Kingston and hopes to help at a new centre in Surbiton.

Dates for diary
Next Social Justice Forum meetings: 11 February, 20 May.
Next Refugees Welcome in Richmond meeting: 11 January, 7.30pm, venue to be confirmed
19-25 June: Refugee Week.
Claudine McCreadie 30 November 2016.